Mehana Blaich Vaughan
Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources
Mehana Blaich Vaughan

Mehana Blaich Vaughan is an assistant professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa. Her research interests include collaborative and community based resource governance; indigenous ecological knowledge; place-based education; common property rights; and approaches to enhance collaboration, learning, and dialogue in decision-making surrounding natural resources. Mehana completed her PhD in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (EIPER) at Stanford University in 2012. Her dissertation focused on collaborative management of a Hawaiian coastal fishery by government agencies and community members. At the University of Hawai’i, Mehana works with a consortium of scholars—from Sea Grant, Hawaiian Studies and Law—who focus on cross-disciplinary solutions to natural and cultural resource management, sustainability, and food security issues. She is also investigating changing patterns of access to natural resources in Hawai’i through an NSF Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability (SEES) postdoctoral fellowship.  Mehana grew up in the rural Halele’a district on the island of Kaua’i. Prior to pursuing a doctoral degree, she taught middle and high school, developing place-based education programs for Hawaiian immersion and charter schools. She has three children and is grateful to her ‘ohana (family) and the many friends, teachers, students, kūpuna (elders) and Hawai’i communities that have supported, guided, and informed her work.

MESSAGE TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS

Thank you for your interest in Professor Ardoin’s lab and Stanford University. Professor Ardoin has a joint appointment in the Graduate School of Education (GSE) and the Woods Institute for the Environment. She advises PhD students through the GSE as well as through her affiliation as a core faculty member in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER). Broadly, her research interests focus on human/nature interactions, with an emphasis on environmental learning as an opportunity to engage people of all ages in living more sustainably within the context of their local environment at a range of scales. She examines environmental issues and behaviors through a social science lens, specifically sociology and anthropology, with an interest also in conservation and environmental psychology.

Professor Ardoin is looking for individuals who are passionate about social ecology, informal and community-based education, and the environment to join her lab. Related to new and ongoing research projects, she is particularly interested in working with graduate students or postdoctoral fellows with interest and expertise in evaluation research (innovative metrics); community-based conservation and community-based research; environmental behavior; sense of place and place research; and philanthropy. Opportunities exist for students with expertise in qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-methods approaches. NOTE: Professor Ardoin will not be accepting new students for the 2018-2019 academic year.

If you are interested in the Ph.D. program, please email Professor Ardoin at nmardoin@stanford.edu. Please be advised that, because of the volume of messages received, you may receive a standardized response.

Stanford UNDERGRADUATE or CO-TERM STUDENTS, please email Professor Ardoin to discuss your interests and potential opportunities for becoming involved in the lab’s work.

For general information about the Ph.D. program at the Stanford University Graduate School of Education, please contact the admissions office staff at gseadmissions@stanford.edu; they can provide details related to deadlines, basic prerequisites, and the various courses of study. For information about science education, please contact Professor Jonathan Osborne or Professor Bryan Brown. For general information about the E-IPER Ph.D. program, please contact E-IPER assistant director Ann Marie Pettigrew at ampetti@stanford.edu. Thank you for your interest!

Anna Lee
Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources
Anna Lee

Anna is a doctoral student in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources.  She is interested in environmental decision-making among producers and consumers in the food system, and studied the social factors that influence alternative farmers' information-gathering strategies as part of her Master's work in the Agroecology Program at UW-Madison before coming to Stanford.  Prior to that, she earned degrees in Earth Systems and Anthropological Sciences at Stanford, and spent two years working and learning at the Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems Apprenticeship program at UCSC.

Becky Niemiec
Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources
Becky Niemiec

Becky is a PhD student in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow. She is interested in the social and ecological dimensions of invasive species management, including how diverse community perspectives and values can be better incorporated into invasive species management plans.  Before coming to Stanford, she was part of a research team at Landcare Research in New Zealand, examining pathways for increasing community engagement in pest control decision-making. Before working with Landcare, Becky received her BA in ecology and environmental studies at Dartmouth College.

Indira Phukan
Graduate School of Education
Indira Phukan

Indira is a PhD candidate in science education at Stanford University's Graduate School of Education and is beginning her research by exploring how diversity in culture and socioeconomic status impacts environmental decision-making behaviors.  She earned a MA in special education through Teach for America and a BA with honors in history from Harvard College.  She has two years experience teaching in a special education classroom in Title 1 schools in Las Vegas, Nevada, as well as experience in formally training and supporting first-year teachers.  Most recently, she has been spending her time working as a field science educator, diversity coordinator, and site manager in Yosemite National Park for NatureBridge, a non-profit environmental education company.

Jose Urteaga
Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources
Jose Urteaga

Jose Urteaga is a first year doctoral student in Stanford’s E-IPER program, whose research interests center on the governance and sustainable management of marine natural resources in developing countries, particularly in Nicaragua. Jose comes to Stanford with a post graduate diploma in Sea Fisheries from the Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Argentina, after completing a BSc in Biological Sciences in 2000 from the same university. Over the past decade, Jose worked with the conservation NGO Fauna & Flora International in Nicaragua, and led the development of a comprehensive Sea Turtle Conservation Program on Nicaragua’s Pacific coast. In 2005, Jose was recognized as a Conservation Hero by the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund; in 2010, he was named as one of the National Geographic Society’s Emerging Explorers. Jose is also a member of the Marine Turtle Specialist Group of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and country co-coordinator of the Wider Caribbean Sea Turtle Network (WIDECAST).

​Shannon Swanson
Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources
​Shannon Swanson

Shannon is a PhD student in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, a Teresa Elms and Robert D. Lindsay Fellow and a National Geographic Young Explorer. She studies fishing communities in small island nations in South East Asia and Oceania and how they are affected by tourism, marine protected areas, conflict, social learning networks, and governance structures. Drawing from her career as a conservation/travel photojournalist, she is also interested in developing new participatory methods of research using film and photography. Before coming to Stanford, she received a masters in Coastal Management from Duke University and a B.S. in Biological Sciences and B.A. in Environmental Studies from UC Santa Barbara.

Lynne Zummo
Graduate School of Education
Lynne Zummo

Lynne Zummo is a PhD student in Science Curriculum and Teacher Education at the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Her research investigates a range of topics, from the integration of environmental education into traditional science classrooms to teacher education through learnable core practices. Her most recent project explored the use of flipped classroom technology in high school Biology classrooms. Prior to Stanford, Lynne taught 9th grade Earth Systems Science for several years in Washington, DC. She earned a BA from Middlebury College and an MS in Earth Sciences from Dartmouth College.

 

Jenna Forsyth
Emmett Interdisciplinary Program on Environment and Resources
Jenna Forsyth

Jenna, a PhD student in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, pursues research that aims to characterize and minimize environmental exposures that undermine child health in low-income countries. Working with communities, she hopes to develop and test solutions to reduce exposures; as part of this work, she is also interested in educational and behavioral approaches to community engagement. Jenna currently focuses on heavy metal exposure in Bangladesh and mosquito-borne disease in Kenya. She holds a master's degree in environmental engineering and global health from the University of Washington and a bachelor's degree in biology from Carleton College.

Kristen Green
Emmett Interdisciplinary Program on Environment and Resources
Kristen Green

Kristen is a PhD student in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources. Her PhD research examines the socio-economic, cultural, and environmental drivers that stimulate stakeholder engagement in Alaskan communities. She is interested in how communities highly dependent on coastal resources might adapt and maintain resiliency in the face of climate change. Prior to beginning her PhD, Kristen worked for six years as biologist and fishery manager for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game where she designed fisheries management strategies and communicated policies for the commercial groundfish and shellfish fisheries in Southeast Alaska. She has extensive experience collaborating with local stakeholders on issues of small-scale fisheries, marine resource use, and developing harvest policies. She holds a Master's in Marine Science with an emphasis in Ichthyology from Moss Landing Marine Labs and a B.S. in Aquatic Biology from UC Santa Barbara.

Francisca Santana
Emmett Interdisciplinary Program on Environment and Resources
Francisca Santana

Francisca is a PhD student in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources. She studies social-ecological dynamics of coastal regions, with a focus on current and historical trends in conservation, governance, and resource use in the Gulf of Mexico. She is interested in examining how resource-dependent human communities interact with various environmental stressors, including energy extraction, nutrient pollution, land loss, and climate change. Before coming to Stanford, Francisca worked on energy and marine policy issues in the nonprofit and government sectors. She received a master's degree in environmental science and management from UC Santa Barbara and a BA in history from Yale University.

Monique Markoff
Graduate School of Education
Monique Markoff

Monique is a PhD candidate in sociology of education at Stanford University's Graduate School of Education and is currently researching how educational institutions play a role in shaping students' environmental identities.  She earned a MA in education at Harvard Graduate School of Education and a BS in human development from Cornell University. Before her time at Stanford she taught middle school math and science for 5 years. She was also a vice-principal and math coach in both Title 1 district and charter contexts. Her love of environmental education research comes from her own years as an outdoor educator, developing links with nature for urban public school students.

Archana Kannan
Graduate School of Education
Archana Kannan

Archana is a PhD student in Science Education at the Graduate School of Education. Prior to starting her PhD, she was a research associate at SK Partners, where she worked towards building measurement and evaluation capacities in informal STEM education. Archana earned an MA in Education from Stanford after completing an MS in Molecular Biology from the University of Toledo and a BSc in Biochemistry from the University of Mumbai. Previously she taught field-trip programs at the California Academy of Sciences where she developed a keen interest in conservation and sustainability education. Archana has a deep passion for science, which comes from spending several years doing laboratory research in biology. She also taught undergraduate biology for 3 years at the University of Toledo. Her current research interests include evaluation in informal education, developing innovative measures of learning, and professional training for informal educators.

Jen Wang
Emmett Interdisciplinary Program on Environment and Resources
Jen Wang

Jen Wang is a Ph.D. candidate in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER). Her research looks at attitudes and decision-making related to prosocial behaviors and common goods, particularly those in the environmental and health domains. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, her current projects consider business attitudes toward environmental sustainability and climate change, variation in teenage food choices by socio-economic status and family food practices, and consumer attitudes and perceptions of “green” products and environmental violations. In addition to her doctoral projects, Jen has worked with a number of organizations such as the Natural Resource Defense Council and the UK Behavioral Insights Team to conduct policy-relevant research, and she co-founded the Stanford Environment Behavior (SEB) student group. She holds a B.S. from Yale University in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology.